Object As...

Object As...

wooden sculpture reminscent of the head of a paddle or brush
ceramic sculpture of upside-down head with flowers leaves and dragonflies adhered to it
shiny black ceramic vessel with coiled texture and various shapes on the surface
model of a jeep with a barge made from a mattress tied to the top and various gear tied to the back pictured on a shoreline
impressionistic oval painting depicting a sun shining down on a landscape with a pond. There's a face in the pond and the landscape is catching fire
Paper sculpture of two houses one red and one black connected by a red string

Objects fashioned by craft artists can do more than appeal to the eye and hand. They can speak to our cultural, political, environmental, and social climates. They can comment on today’s issues and inspire conversations. They can be acts of rebellion.

That’s the point of the “Object As . . .” project, for which six artists were chosen by six curators selected by the American Craft Council. The artists (and the curators who chose them) are Morel Doucet (Sanjit Sethi), James Maurelle (Jennifer-Navva Milliken), Leandro Gómez Quintero (Stuart Ashman), Bukola Koiki (Malene Barnett), Ebitenyefa Baralaye (Andrew Blauvelt), and Alex Anderson (Suzanne Isken).

Supported by the National Endowment for the Arts, the artists created works that speak—subtly, directly, intimately, publicly—about issues that matter to them. The works testify to the diversity of makers and practices and to the ongoing impact of craft on our lives.

Via the links below, you’ll see photos of the objects the artists created, along with stories from the artists about how those objects came into being and what they mean to their makers. We have also shared what the curators have written about the artworks. Starting mid April, American Craft Podcast episodes featuring interviews with the artists—in which they talk more about the process of making these objects—will be posted on these pages every other week. Let the conversations begin.

 

The Hills We Die On (Flowers for President Jovenel Moïse) | Morel Doucet

ceramic sculpture of upside-down head with flowers leaves and dragonflies adhered to it
portrait of morel doucet

Artist: Morel Doucet
Curator: Sanjit Sethi

Read the Object Stories
Listen to the Interview

MAROON(ED) | James Maurelle

portrait of james maurelle

Artist: James Maurelle
Curator: Jennifer-Navva Milliken

Read the Object Stories
Listen to the Interview

wooden sculpture reminscent of a paddle or brush

Transportarte a Baracoa | Leandro Gómez Quintero

model of a jeep with a barge made from a mattress tied to the top and various gear tied to the back pictured on a shoreline

Artist: Leandro Gómez Quintero
Curator: Stuart Ashman

Read the Object Stories

portrait of leandro gomez quintero

The Pull | Bukola Koiki

portrait of bukola koiki
Paper sculpture of two houses one red and one black connected by a red string

Artist: Bukola Koiki
Curator: Malene Barnett

Read the Object Stories

All My Relation: I | Ebitenyefa Baralaye

shiny black ceramic vessel with coiled texture and various shapes on the surface
portrait of Ebitenyefa Baralaye

Artist: Ebitenyefa Baralaye
Curator: Andrew Satake Blauvelt

Read the Object Stories

Burn It All Away | Alex Anderson

portrait of alex anderson

Artist: Alex Anderson
Curator: Suzanne Isken

Read the Object Stories
Listen to the Interview

impressionistic oval painting depicting a sun shining down on a landscape with a pond. There's a face in the pond and the landscape is catching fire

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This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. To find out more about how National Endowment for the Arts grants impact individuals and communities, visit www.arts.gov.